Prof. Karel (iii) František WIESNER, - PhD chemist

Prof. Karel (iii) František WIESNER, - PhD chemist

Muž 1919 - 1986  (67 let)

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  • Jméno Prof. Karel (iii) František WIESNER, - PhD chemist 
    Předpona Prof. 
    Přípona - PhD chemist 
    Narození 25 Listopad 1919  Praha, Czech Rep. Najít všechny osoby s událostmi v tomto místě 
    Pohlaví Muž 
    Studia 1946-1948  Zurich, Switzerland Najít všechny osoby s událostmi v tomto místě 
    ETH 
    Úmrtí 28 Listopad 1986  Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada Najít všechny osoby s událostmi v tomto místě 
    ID číslo osoby I467  family
    Poslední změna 17 Srpen 2015 

    Otec Karel (ii) František WIESNER,   nar. 1892, Czech Rep. Najít všechny osoby s událostmi v tomto místě,   zemř. 1980, Canada Najít všechny osoby s událostmi v tomto místě  (Věk 88 let) 
    Matka Evženie Růžena (Ebina) STEROVÁ-WIESNEROVÁ,   nar. 16 Květen 1898, Pravonín, Czech Rep. Najít všechny osoby s událostmi v tomto místě,   zemř. 25 Únor 1998, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada Najít všechny osoby s událostmi v tomto místě  (Věk 99 let) 
    Sňatek 1919 
    ID číslo rodiny F154  Schéma rodiny

    Rodina Blanka PEVNÁ-WIESNEROVÁ,   nar. 9 Listopad 1923, Olomouc, Czech Rep. Najít všechny osoby s událostmi v tomto místě  (Věk 95 let) 
    Sňatek Praha, Czech Rep. Najít všechny osoby s událostmi v tomto místě 
    Děti 
     1. Karel (iv) J. WIESNER,   nar. Canada Najít všechny osoby s událostmi v tomto místě
    Poslední změna 25 Srpen 2014 
    ID číslo rodiny F156  Schéma rodiny

  • Mapa událostí
    Odkaz na Google MapsNarození - 25 Listopad 1919 - Praha, Czech Rep. Odkaz na Google Earth
    Odkaz na Google MapsStudia - ETH - 1946-1948 - Zurich, Switzerland Odkaz na Google Earth
    Odkaz na Google MapsÚmrtí - 28 Listopad 1986 - Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada Odkaz na Google Earth
    Odkaz na Google MapsSňatek - - Praha, Czech Rep. Odkaz na Google Earth
     = Odkaz na Google Maps 
     = Odkaz na Google Earth 

  • Fotografie
    WIESNER Karel František, Prof. (UNB honorary doctorate) 1970
    WIESNER Karel František, Prof. (UNB honorary doctorate) 1970
    Na University of New Brunswick (Fredericton, NB, Canada) in 1970, Prof. Karel (iii) WIESNER dostává čestný doktorát (1970) od Sir Max Aitkena.

  • Poznámky 
    • «b»CTRNACTY >>> WIESNER
      «/b»«tab»«u»<http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/770040?uid=3739464&uid=2129&uid=2&uid=70&uid=3737720&uid=4&sid=21101151472037>«/u»
      by W.G. Schneider and Z. Valenta Fellows of the Royal Society, vol.37 (Nov. 1991), pp.462-490.
      «b»KAREL WIESNER«/b» was born on 25 November 1919 in Prague at the home of his maternal grand-parents the only child of Karel Frantisek WIESNER (1892-1980) and his wife Evzenie Ruzena nee STEROVa (1898-1998). THE HOME OF HIS Prague grandparents stood on the quay of the Vltava (Moldau) River, its windows facing the historic panorama of the Hradcany Castle and St. Vitus cathedral, a location Wiesner probably would have chosen himself, since his love of his country and pride in its history stayed with him all through his life.
      On his father's side, he came from a widely respected family of eastern Bohemia, engaged for three generations in mechanical engineering. Wiesner's great-grandfather, Frantisek WIESNER (1833-1880), son of a poor farm laborer, rose to become builder and operator of the largest machine manufacturing plant and steel mill in Chrudim, eastern Bohemia. To generations of school children, he came to represent what is meant by a passion for excellence and hard work. Leading Czech writer and poet, Jan Neruda, wrote a story of Frantisek's life and accomplishments which was featured in the primary reading book throughout the country. It related the life of a self-taught man who almost singlehandedly modernized the economy of eastern Bohemia and brough unprecendented prosperity to the country, along with a high reputation for Czech workmanship - an important factor in the self-esteem of a reawakening nation.

      Karel WIESNER's mother, «b»EVŽENIE RUŽENA«/b», was the only child of František STER (1862-1939) and «b»EVŽENIE ČTRNÁCTÁ (1878-1928)«/b». František STER, a successful lumber merchant, was best known for having established the independent Prague timber stock exchange, which assured the country's lumber industry fair competition with its neighbours in Central Europe.
      KW's early childhood was spent in the country, at the village of Mocovice, where his father was in charge of one of the family's sugar mills. At the age of nine, Wiesner and his parents moved to Chrudim, the seat of the Wiesner family home and steel mill, from now on managed by the boy's uncles and his - -«u»«b»«i»
      «/u»«/b»«/i»
      EVŽENIE ČTRNÁCTÁ (*1878) was a «b»cousin«/b» of grandma (to BViii) Růžena Čtrnáctá-VOLESKÁ (1876-1974) whose father MUDr. František Čtrnáctý (*1845) had a BROTHER («b»Karel«/b», soukromý ůředník v Praze) who had a daughter EVŽENIE (1878-1926) = cousin to Růžena ČTRNÁCTÁ-Voleská (*1876). That it was really «b»KAREL «/b»who had Evženie (and not another brother) is unconfirmed - but all the (first only) names appear on the death announcement (parte in the documents) of Marie Čtrnáctá ( «b»†«/b»1890-7-27).
      It is hard to guess what child belongs to who (parents) since all Marie's grandchildren appear grouped separately on the parte.

      «u»«i»http://www.science.ca/scientists/scientistprofile.php?pID=231«/u»«/i»
      Wiesner was born in 1919 in Prague, Czechoslovakia. He received his PhD in Prague where he studied polarography at Bulovka Hospital. He came to the University of New Brunswick in 1948 where he developed Canada's leading school of natural products chemistry \emdash the extraction and characterization of naturally occurring chemicals from plants and animals. His former students are found at most of the major chemistry schools in Canada. He determined the chemical structure and synthesis of very complicated alkaloids and made major contributions to the fields of terpenoids and steroids.

      «u»<https://lib.unb.ca/archives/finding/chem/apndxcc.html>«/u» «b»
      Biographical history:«/b» A native of Prague, Czechoslovakia, «b»Karel (Charles) Wiesner«/b» (1919-1986) began his academic career in an unusual way. Prior to the outbreak of World War II, Wiesner had decided to enrol at Karlova (Charles) Universita, Prague. His plans changed, however, when the German army occupied his country, and subsequently, closed the universities. During the war, Wiesner found work in a hospital research laboratory and in pharmaceutical and analytical firms. He also established a home laboratory so that he could teach himself physical chemistry.
      Working on his own, Wiesner discovered a method for measuring certain fast chemical reactions. When Charles University reopened after the war, he was granted a doctorate for his work. For the next two years, Wiesner studied organic chemistry under Prof. Valdo Prelog at E.T.H. in Zurich. In 1948, with the whole-hearted endorsement of Frank Toole, Wiesner, then aged 29, arrived in Fredericton to begin work as Professor of Chemistry at UNB.
      A brilliant organic chemist and a highly-respected academic, Wiesner devoted much time to research. His scholarly reputation and his enthusiasm for his work attracted a number of talented Canadian and international scholars to UNB. During his career, he wrote approximately 200 scientific papers, supervised over 80 graduate theses and headed numerous research projects, many of them made possible by industrial funds and National Research Council grants. In fact, his professional reputation was largely responsible for securing research monies which were used to purchase equipment, to fund projects and to support graduate students at UNB. Wiesner also travelled widely, presenting conference papers and lecturing at Canadian, American, British and European universities.
      With departmental approval, in 1962 Wiesner accepted the position of associate director of research with Ayerst Research Laboratories, a pharmaceutical company located in Montreal. His work for Ayerst necessitated his absence from UNB. In 1964 he returned to the Chemistry Department to assume the position of Research Professor.
      Wiesner's reputation as a fine scholar and his valuable contributions to the field of natural product chemistry won him the admiration and respect of the academic and scientific communities. Over the course of his career he received numerous honours. He was named a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1957 and a Fellow of the Royal Society of London in 1969. The Chemical Institute of Canada awarded him the Palladium Medal in 1963, the institute's highest honour. In addition, Wiesner received several honourary doctor of science degrees as well as the Royal Society of London's Centennial Medal, the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences' Drinov Medal and the American Chemical Society's Ernest Guenther Prize. In 1975 he was appointed Officer of the Order of Canada and the following year was named University Professor, the highest honour UNB awards its working professors. The Pontifical Academy of Sciences, Rome, honoured him in 1978 by granting him membership. Wiesner died at Fredericton on 28 November 1986 following a lengthy illness.

      «u»<http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/en/article/karel-wiesner/#h3_jump_0>«/u»
      «b»Karel Wiesner«/b», chemist, educator (b at Prague, Czech 1919; d at Fredericton 28 Nov 1986). Wiesner studied chemical engineering in Prague, receiving his doctorate in 1945 for research in polarography at Bulovka Hospital. He studied in Switzerland before coming to UNB in 1948 where he developed Canada's leading school of natural products chemistry. His former students are found at most of the major chemistry schools in Canada. In 1957 he was elected a fellow of the RSC and in 1963 received the highest honour of the Chemical Institute of Canada. He authored more than 200 papers in organic chemistry, and made major contributions in the fields of alkaloids, terpenoids and steroids.
      «b» «/b»